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MORE TOYS TO COME.  SEE ALSO TINY HOUSES
The smallest doll?
The one shown is about 1/8 of an inch tall,  but with the same method you can go as small as you dare. 
You will need:.
At least one toothpick (cocktail stick), round if possible
A square inch of gift-wrapping tissue
Half an inch of sewing thread in black, brown, or yellow
Some kind of glue
Sandpaper or emory board
A sharp knife or razor blade
A pin, any kind                                          
If possible, a hole punch (for ring binder paper) and some tweezers

Method: 
If your toothpick is sharp, sand it down till it's about a millimetre or 1/32 inch across at the tip. 

Fold the tissue paper in four, and punch out some holes.  Or cut holes about 1/4" diameter freehand with scissors.  Make a hole in the centre with a pin.

Push the toothpick tip through the hole a little way.  You now have the rudiments of a doll, the tissue  being her dress and the tip of the toothpick her head.

Smear a very small amount of glue on her body, and with a pin or tweezers arrange the dress in folds.  If it looks bad, try adding another layer of tissue.  Allow to dry.

Get another toothpick, or the other end of the first one, if it's pointed at both ends.  With a sharp blade, split the end in half.  The split only has to be 1/16 inch long.  Now cut off the split end.  With a little  bit of luck you now have two arms, which you can glue on the sides of the doll.

Fray your scrap of sewing thread, and cut it into minute fragments.  Put a little glue on the back of the doll's head, and dip the head into the pile of fragments.  Let dry, then trim the hair you have just made so that the doll's face can be seen.  If you are really looking for trouble, paint on some eyes and maybe a mouth.

Inspect the doll, and cut her off her toothpick at hem level.  You now have a doll in a long dress.  If you want a short dress, cut it shorter and shape the bottom of  the doll into legs.  Not recommended, really, but possible.
For a slightly larger and more detailed doll see Toothpick doll.
                                  Tiny Toys            page 1 of 2
suitable for a 1/144 scale toyshop or nursery
Believe it or not, these are quite suitable for beginners to make, because they don't require special skills or special tools.  Good eyesight would be useful, and a little craziness wouldn't hurt.
If possible, work on a large clear surface with the kind of flooring beneath you that won't let tiny things hide in it.  At least half of your attempts are likely to disappear, usually on the floor.
Tiny boat
You will need:
A used wooden match, or a toothpick, preferably square, or any piece of wood that size
A bristle from a scrubbing brush
A pin
Paint, or a coloured marker
White paper
Any glue
Scissors
Sharp knife or sandpaper or emery board or file

Method
Shape one end of the matchstick to a point on three sides to make the bow of the boat.  (You can make the keel sharp as in diagram A or flat as in B.)  Leave the fourth side flat for the deck.

About 1/16" from the tip, make a  hole with the pin in the deck.  (Ideally, drill a hole with a number 77 bit.)

Mark off where the stern of the boat will  be (about 1/4" from the bow), and partially shape the stern on three sides, but leave it still just attached to the rest of the matchstick.

Insert the bristle into the hole in the deck.  If it fits, take it out and put a little glue on the end and glue it in  place as a mast.

Let glue dry while you make the sails by cutting triangles out of white paper. Using as little glue as possible, glue the sails to the mast and/or the deck and/or one another. Add a paper flag if you like.

Paint or colour with marker, leaving the deck clear wood or painted white.  Do this while the boat is still attached to its stick, then when the paint is dry, cut the boat off and sand and paint the stern. 

Toys in Miniature: Frances Armstrong
They insisted on turning their backs to the camera.   Two dolls still attached to their toothpicks
MORE TOYS TO COME.  SEE ALSO TINY HOUSES
Boat
Home
Projects
Cars and trucks    
You will need:
A used wooden match, or a square toothpick
Paint, or a coloured marker, and a sharp pencil.  Silver pen optional.
Sharp knife or sandpaper or emery board or file

Method:

Make sure your knife is sharp and that the match or toothpick cuts easily.  They vary a great deal in quality, but they're certainly cheap and available.

At the unburnt end of the match, carve a small vehicle according to the diagrams on the right.   As you should be able to see, I first indicate by a line where you should make a cut, then by a black section the wood that should be removed.  If your knife won't cut as far as the lines suggest, just remove less wood each time.  Don't force the knife into the wood, just take tiny shavings if necessary, with very little pressure.  The wheels are just solid bars across the underside, made in the first three diagrams.

Paint the truck, or colour with marker.  (You will probably want a shiny look--clear nailpolish is worth a try.)  Use a combination of ordinary pencil and a silver marker to indicate the windows, and perhaps add a touch of chrome (though real cars don't have much of that these days).  Add tail lights in red or orange if you  like.

You can use much the same method to carve cars or vans:

Vehicles
EXTRA-DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS

I've used toothpicks and matches and so on because I'm aiming at those without access to special materials.  Harder woods like cherry would be better, of course.
EXTRA-DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS
Tools
Techniques
Materials
Tips
For your first attempt, start with a wooden matchstick.  Then go smaller!  A matchstick is a scale foot across.
Even tinier boat.

Challenge yourself!  If you followed the diagrams above, your boat will probably end up 2 or 3 scale feet long.  This is quite appropriate for outdoor ponds, but for the bathtub a child will need something smaller.

So see how small you can go!  Use a better quality wood if you can, and give yourself confidence by first putting the mast in place.  Make a hole in what will be the deck, and glue your bristle in it.  Allow to dry for ten minutes, then test the strength of the joint.  

If the mast stays in place, you can use it as a handle while you carve away almost all the wood until you have a very very tiny boat.  (Perfectionists at this point will want to replace the mast because it will look too thick.  Try a soft toothbrush bristle.  Lazier folk will hide the mast behind the paper sails.
Drumt.
An easy one, but it looks best done with care.  You need a toothpick or dowel, 1/16 to 1/8 inch diameter.  Find some red paper (Christmas card envelopes?) and with a gold gel marker make a zigzag along one edge.  If your hands aren't steady, keep on zigzagging till you've got about half an inch of evenly spaced Vs.

Cut out the strip you've been marking, and glue it around the dowel.  It's easier to attach just the end and let the glue dry, as in the photograph; then you can measure the remainder and cut it off in the appropriate place (which here I hope will mean cutting off that messy V near the end).

Glue on securely, then roll the toothpick under your knife blade, gradually cutting deeper, till the drum comes off leaving a nice clean top which should pass for parchment. 

Drumsticks

Again one of those useful bristles.  Dip the very ends of the bristle into white acrylic paint, twice if necessary, and let dry.  You will have neat little knobs on each end.  Cut off the sticks at an appropriate length (about the same as the drum's width).  Glue them on the drum before they get lost.
Tinier boat
Drum
Suitable for beginners

No special tools or materials needed

Some effort required

This page was last updated on: May 15, 2010

average.

easy
Doll
The smallest doll?
The one shown is about 1/8 of an inch tall,  but with the same method you can go as small as you dare. 
You will need:.
At least one toothpick (cocktail stick), round if possible
A square inch of gift-wrapping tissue
Half an inch of sewing thread in black, brown, or yellow
Some kind of glue
Sandpaper or emory board
A sharp knife or razor blade
A pin, any kind                                          
If possible, a hole punch (for ring binder paper) and some tweezers

Method: 
If your toothpick is sharp, sand it down till it's about a millimetre or 1/32 inch across at the tip. 

Fold the tissue paper in four, and punch out some holes.  Or cut holes about 1/4" diameter freehand with scissors.  Make a hole in the centre with a pin.

Push the toothpick tip through the hole a little way.  You now have the rudiments of a doll, the tissue  being her dress and the tip of the toothpick her head.

Smear a very small amount of glue on her body, and with a pin or tweezers arrange the dress in folds.  If it looks bad, try adding another layer of tissue.  Allow to dry.

Get another toothpick, or the other end of the first one, if it's pointed at both ends.  With a sharp blade, split the end in half.  The split only has to be 1/16 inch long.  Now cut off the split end.  With a little  bit of luck you now have two arms, which you can glue on the sides of the doll.

Fray your scrap of sewing thread, and cut it into minute fragments.  Put a little glue on the back of the doll's head, and dip the head into the pile of fragments.  Let dry, then trim the hair you have just made so that the doll's face can be seen.  If you are really looking for trouble, paint on some eyes and maybe a mouth.

Inspect the doll, and cut her off her toothpick at hem level.  You now have a doll in a long dress.  If you want a short dress, cut it shorter and shape the bottom of  the doll into legs.  Not recommended, really, but possible.
For a slightly larger and more detailed doll see Toothpick doll.
Red  wagon
Toys page 2
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