See also Tools, Techniques, and Materials
To avoid cutting yourself
Use as sharp a knife as possible, and then put very little pressure on it.  If it slips, it won't go far.  But even a tiny drop of blood is something we don't want.  I cut through some tendons as a teenager, so I don't advise learning the hard way!

Always envisage where the knife would go if it slipped, and keep your fingers and other body parts out of the way.  If you are really nervous or clumsy, wear a glove on your "holding" hand, or protect them with tape.  Lee Valley Tools have a special green tape for this purpose.

For more about knives and cutting, go to Tools and
Techniques
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Tips for working in smaller scales
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Trouble visualizing the size of items in 1/144 scale? 

As a very rough guide, use your own hand.  A small female hand is about the size of a 1/12 person, that is, a person in a "normal" doll- house, and a fingernail is about the size of a 1/144 person.  To find out which fingernail, you'll have to measure your own and choose one that's just under half an inch long.  (If you wear false fingernails all the time, you may not be the right person to be trying this scale.)
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Getting things straight
Many miniaturists seem to feel mathematically inadequate, and this is a problem because the one thing that does make a miniature scene look "wrong" is having things crooked that were meant to be straight.  In 1/12 scale this looks like carelessness, but in smaller scales it looks like incompetence.  So here are some suggestions for those uncomfortable with terms like right angles and degrees.
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For your first projects, choose garden or outdoor scenes, mouse houses or tree houses or other structures that are small or light enough not to need to be strongly built.
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When you do want corners to be square, use jigs and squares and similar devices, but remember that even an extra thick layer of glue can throw a tiny object out of line.  Try to develop an eye for straightness.
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Check for squareness by looking at what you've made in a mirror, or scanning or photographing it.  The truth will be revealed!
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Using squared paper (covered with wax paper) helps keep things lined up.                    
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What to do with your failures

1/144 scale furniture and accessories have the advantage of requiring little material, so you can throw them away--but what about all the time you spent on them?
If you made them the wrong size, consider making a Goldilocks scene.
If furniture turns out too big, call it doll furniture, the kind made to fit real-life dolls a foot or two tall.
If furniture turns out too small, give it to a miniature mouse.
If a chair ends up with three legs, add a broken one and you're back with Goldilocks.  Or you can make a carpenter's shop, an antique shop, a garage sale. 
Or give it to a child four inches high and make a scene with her crying because it's broken, or trying to fix it.

To avoid cutting yourself
Use as sharp a knife as possible, and then put very little pressure on it.  If it slips, it won't go far.  But even a tiny drop of blood is something we don't want.  I cut through some tendons as a teenager, so I don't advise learning the hard way!

Always envisage where the knife would go if it slipped, and keep your fingers and other body parts out of the way.  If you are really nervous or clumsy, wear a glove on your "holding" hand, or protect them with tape.  Lee Valley Tools have a special green tape for this purpose.

For more about knives and cutting, go to Tools and
Techniques
.
.Measuring without mathematics
Get a set of children's Lego bricks and use them as units of measurement, when  you're making buildings from scratch.  You can put together, say, a cube of Lego three bricks long and two wide and two high, and that would represent one floor of your 1/144 house.  (I'm thinking of the bricks that are about 1" x 1/2" x 1/4", but you can use any.)

This block becomes a jig which will help you get the walls straight and will also help you put a ceiling on top of the room, nice and level.  (But don't glue the room shut with the Lego  blocks inside!)  Picture coming


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Colour in 1/144 scale
I don't have the knowledge to talk technically about this (and I'd be glad to hear from someone who does).  In ordinary 1/12 scale, miniaturists usually discover that colours used should be subtle rather than bright and full of contrasts.  Somewhere between 1/12 scale and 1/144 scale this changes.  A room that's only an inch or so wide and high often needs some very bright touches, like jewels.  Otherwise the whole thing blurs together.

On the other hand, some people may like the blurry effect, because of the contrast when they get really close and find the room is full of detail.
Weight
This can be a problem for the perfectionist (and I'm referring to the weight of the miniature, not the miniature-maker).  Little things are very light.  (Mathematical note: because weight depends on volume, and if you make a brick that is 1/144 the length, 1/144 the breadth, and 1/144 the height of a regular brick, it will weigh 1/(144 x 144 x 144) or 1/2985984 of the weight of the normal brick.  Not much.
          Somehow, though, we expect a miniature to have more weight than it does, and it's certainly easier to handle things that don't keep flying away.  One solution is to use cast metal miniatures.  But although these are often nice and detailed, some of us would rather have a fabric bedspread (even if it's out of scale) than a painted one. 
          You could try adding weights to miniatures; I've tried putting lead feet on my 1/144 people.  But it isn't really enough to work.  So the best solution I can offer so far is to coat the feet or base of each miniature with one of the movable glues.
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The art of honest deception
We all know perfectly well that if a half-inch-high person moved into one of our 1/144 houses he or she would find it crude and inconvenient.  But we have to pretend that this is not so.  Faced with the challenges of working with big-scale fabrics and our limited vision, how do we trick ourselves and others into ignoring the defects and being entranced by the charm of what we've made?
          First, face the fact that for some people tiny things fall into two categories: bugs and jewels.  I've had customers who wanted to swat my tiny chairs.  You can either dismiss such alien minds, or present your miniature in a larger cosier environment--put the chair on a rug in a room, perhaps?
          Better still, go for the jewelled look.  Have something bright or sparkling or strange enough to draw attention.  Then, once you have your viewers' attention, provide something extra that will keep those viewers viewing.  A blob of red on a table draws the eye, and then they find they're looking at a bowl of apples, and then they see that one of the apples is partly peeled, and there's a little knife . . . 
          And if they go on imagining details that they think might be there, if they had a better pair of glasses, the microminiature world has won some more converts.
Toys in Miniature: Frances Armstrong
See also Tools, Techniques, and Materials
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Comments and contributions would be most welcome.